Sensory Processing and Constipation

Hi! 👋 I am Sarah from www.sensoryexplorers.com



⁠ ID: pink square with the words Identifying sensory processing patterns of children with bowel issues can optimize and complement medical and behavioral interventions for constipation and the article citation.⁠ ⁠ Citation: Little, Lauren M. et al.  (2019) Contribution of Sensory Processing to Chronic Constipation in Preschool Children  The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 210, 141 - 145⁠ ⁠ #PediatricOccupationalTherapy #BowelAndBladder #PelvicHealth #HealthyKids #KidsHealth #DryNights #Constipation #Sensory #Potty #research #collaboration #constipation⁠ ⁠ ⚠️ This content is for education purposes only. This is not a substitute for medical or therapeutic advice. Problems? Please consult your doctor.
Is there a link between sensory processing and constipation?



I am an occupational therapist here to help you with your kiddo's bowl and bladder health. I'm so glad you're here!⁠ ⁠


In an article published in the Journal of Pediatrics (Little, et.al 2019) researchers examined the relationship of sensory processing profiles and chronic constipation in typically developing preschoolers (ages 3-5).


You can access the abstract (summary) of the article HERE and you can read a summary of the article here


Researchers used the Child Sensory Profile-2 to evaluate the participant's sensory profiles and the Toileting Habit Questionnaire to determine toileting habits. These are both evaluation tools used by Occupational Therapists and other professionals to gather and interpret information related to functioning.


The researchers wanted to find out if children with constipation have a difference in sensory processing than those children who do not have chronic constipation. They also wanted to find out if a sensory profile can predict if a child is over or under responsive to toileting.


What they found was that children who have chronic constipation also present with a heightened sensory sensitivity. Along with this children with chronic constipation also had an increased likelihood of oral sensitivities and picky eating.


The researchers noted that you can optimize and complement medical and behavioral interventions for constipation. ⁠ ⁠


It's important to note that this study did not find that sensory profiles were a cause of dysfunctional toileting - but that there was a relationship between those factors. More research needs to be done to establish cause and to investigate the relationship further.


What this article DID support is that it's important to consider a child's sensory preferences and aversions when addressing toileting issues.


⁠ ⁠Collaboration with medical professionals and referral to an occupational therapist are important and meaningful way to help children who are experiencing bowel and bladder dysfunction. ⁠ ⁠


ID: pink square with the words Identifying sensory processing patterns of children with bowel issues can optimize and complement medical and behavioral interventions for constipation and the article citation.⁠ ⁠


Citation: Little, Lauren M. et al. (2019) Contribution of Sensory Processing to Chronic Constipation in Preschool Children The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 210, 141 - 145⁠


⚠️ This content is for education purposes only. This is not a substitute for medical or therapeutic advice. Please consult your doctor if you have questions about your child.

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